Landscape and Panoramic Photography

HDR

Bulb Exposure of Mt Sopris and Clouds

While driving across the country in June, I stopped in Carbondale, Colorado to take my annual photograph of Mt Sopris. This time I decided to make the long shadows across the field an abstract, black foreground element. Exposure time was ~4-5 minutes with a 10-stop ND filter to get a little blur in the passing clouds.

SoprisBulbExp_June2020_BW_WebsiteSizeMt Sopris, Shadow, and Clouds (B&W, Bulb), near Carbondale, CO (7″x16″)


Snoqualmie Falls Panorama

Panorama of Snoqualmie Falls- wish I had included a bit more foreground as the bottom of the ravine feels cut off in this one. I’ll have to take another trip out there when it’s more foggy/cloudy so I don’t get that burned out white spot in the sky!

SnoqualmieFalls_Color_Pano1Snoqualmie Falls in Late Winter (Color Panorama #1), Snoqualmie, WA (16″x28″)

 


Snoqualmie Falls in Black and White

Shooting a few long-exposure photographs of Snoqualmie Falls has been on my bucket list, so I decided to check the location off my list last weekend- rainy/cloudy conditions were in the weather forecast, but the sun started poking through the clouds as I got there. Winter sun is usually a relief in the Pacific Northwest, but not for long-exposure photography.

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Snoqualmie Falls in Late Winter (BW #1), Snoqualmie, WA (12″x18″)


Fog and Falls along Talapus Lake Trail

The light took on a silver quality as the fog thickened on my hike down from Talapus Lake so I decided to stop and photograph the stream flowing out of the lake.

 

TalapusLakeTrail_Stream_Fog_Moss_Vertical_ColorFog, Falls, and Trees near Talapus Lake, Alpine Lakes Wilderness, WA (12″x18″)

 

TalapusLakeTrail_Stream_Fog_Moss_Panorama_Color.jpgFog, Falls, and Moss near Talapus Lake, Alpine Lakes Wilderness, WA (16″x36″)

 


Thomas Lakes and Mount Sopris, 2019

Blue hour bulb/ND panorama of snow fields, cirque, and summit of Mt Sopris from Upper Thomas Lake at Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, White River National Forest. It was hard to get the exposure right as the light was fading- you can probably tell that the panorama gets darker from left to right as I left the exposure times the same for each of the frames in the shot. The second panorama is from the following morning- I used a B&W conversion to try to emphasize the texture of the rocks and clouds.

UpperThomasLake_Sopris_BlueHourUpper Thomas Lake and Mt Sopris at Blue Hour (2019),
Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado (16″x35″)

UpperThomasLake_Morning_Clouds_Pano_BWUpper Thomas Lake, Mt Sopris, and Morning Clouds (B&W),
Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado (16″x40″)


Downed Trees after Winter Storm

Downed, broken trees from a winter storm scattered around Coal Creek and falls near Bellevue, WA.

CoalCreekFallsDownedTrees_Vert_SingleFrame_2019

Coal Creek Falls and Logs, near Bellevue, WA (12″x18″)


Crystal River along CO-133

I stopped to photograph Hayes Creek Falls along Colorado-133 (south of Carbondale, just west of Mount Sopris). Water was barely trickling over the Falls, so I crossed CO-133 and shot a few bulb exposures of the water flowing around the rocks in the Crystal River. Hoping this area recovers from drought and fire season.

CrystalRiver_BearsGulch_CO_BulbPano_2018

Crystal River (Bulb Panorama), near Bears Gulch, CO (16″x54″)

CrystalRiver_BearsGulch_CO_BulbSingleFrame_2018

Crystal River (Bulb Single Frame), near Bears Gulch, CO (10″x18″)

 


Spouting Rock above Hanging Lake, CO

Visiting the same location year after year forces me to try to see the same scene from new perspectives. This summer, I spent more time to the right of the falls taking a few long exposures of the water flowing out of the limestone at Spouting Rock above Hanging Lake.

SpoutingRock_Panorama3_Horizontal.jpg

Spouting Rock (Horizontal #3, Color, 2018), Hanging Lake, Colorado (16″x20″)

 

SpoutingRock_Panorama1_Vert_2018

Spouting Rock (Vertical #3, Color, 2018), Hanging Lake, Colorado (28″x16″)

 

 


Meltwater Stream and Coleman Glacier

I walked up the lateral moraine along Coleman Glacier and stopped to shoot a long-exposure panorama of the meltwaters flowing out of the snow and ice. I liked this composition because it captured the stream, house-sized seracs (chunks of ice in the middle of the panorama above the snow field), and Mt Baker peeking over the ridge and snow field in the background.

ColemanGlacier_Meltwater3_ColorMeltwater and Coleman Glacier (#3, Color), Mt Baker Wilderness, Washington (16″x54″)

 


Falls along Creek near Annette Lake

A single-frame photograph of the falls along the creek running out of Annette Lake in western Washington.

HumpackFalls_SingleFrame_1x1.jpgHumpback Falls (Single Frame), Mt. Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, WA (16″x16″)


Falls along Humpback Creek

After hiking up to Annette Lake and Silver Peak, I stopped at the falls along Humpback Creek to photograph the moss, rocks, and water. Clouds had moved in throughout the day, providing nice lighting for a few bulb exposures.

Humpback_Falls_Pano1_HDR

Humpback Falls (#1, Color), Mt. Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, WA (16″x32″)


Silver Peak Summit

Views from the summit of Silver Peak, Cascade Range in early June.

SilverPeak_Pano1_BWSilver Peak Summit (#1, B&W), Cascade Range, WA (16″x47″)

SilverPeak_Pano2_ColorSilver Peak Summit (#2, Color), Cascade Range, WA (16″x61″)

 


Franklin Falls, WA

After moving to the Seattle area from southern Arizona last summer, I took a weekend walk up to Franklin Falls to photograph the South fork of the Snoqualmie River as it cascades over a 70-foot cliff. Large falls are always a treat after living in the desert.

Franklin Falls and Rainbow (#2, Color), near Bend, WA. (12″x18″)

Franklin Falls (#3, B&W), near Bend, WA (16″x46″)


Hoh Rainforest Stream, 2017

Nearly 10 years ago, I took a rainy solo backpacking trip up the Hoh River in Olympic National Park. I remember photographing a stream surrounded by emerald green ferns and hanging moss. Late last summer, I hiked up the same trail along the Hoh River and tried to photograph the same subject (but from a new perspective, a decade later). Overcast conditions again provided diffuse light that allowed for even lighting during longer exposures.

HohStream_Panorama1_Color

Hoh Stream (Panorama #1, 2017), Olympic National Park, WA (42″x16″)

 


Ring Road Stream and Cliffs, Iceland

Roadside stream cascades over rocks in southern Iceland along the Ring Road.

Cliff_Farm_Stream_SIceland_PanoColor1Cliff, Farm, and Stream (Color #1), southern Iceland (16″x53″)


Svartifoss, Iceland

The cascading waters of Svartifoss slowly eat away at the rock, leaving jumbled piles of basalt in the ravine below. Columnar jointing in basalt flows + waterfall = perfect photography opportunity for a Geoscientist (and thousands of other photographers).

Svartifoss_Panorama_BW_IcelandSvartifoss and Columnar Basalt, Vatnajökull National Park,Iceland (16″x36″)


Roadside Falls, East Iceland

The desolate drive along the Ring Road between Mývatn and Egilsstaðir in East Iceland passes through a windswept plateau where golden grasses creep up the steep slopes of hills (first panorama).

On our descent to Egilsstaðir in the Jökuldalur valley, I stopped to photograph the Rjukandi Falls as they poured over cliffs on their way to the Jökulsá a Brú river (second and third panoramas).

Light_Grassy_Hillsides_Plateau_2_IcelandLight on Grassy Hillsides on the Plateau (#2), East Iceland (16″x81″)

Rjúkandi_Falls_1_EastIcelandYst Í Rjúkandi Falls (#1), East Iceland (16″x35″)

Rjúkandi_Falls_2_EastIcelandYst Í Rjúkandi Falls (#2), East Iceland (28″x16″)


Dettifoss, Iceland

At 44m tall and 100m wide, Dettifoss is a spectacularly large curtain of water pouring over a shelf of rock in northern Iceland. Sediment turns the waters (from the melting Vatnajökull glacier) of the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river a strange grey. Mist billowing up from the canyon makes bulb panorama exposures near the falls difficult to shoot (the camera gets wet quickly, and the lens gets covered in water spots). To give a sense of the size of the Dettifoss, I also included a single-frame bulb photograph of the opposite bank (note the person in the red rain jacket standing on the rocks above the falls)

Dettifoss_Bulb_4_IcelandDettifoss and Jökulsá á Fjöllum (Bulb #4), northern Iceland (16″x66″)

Dettifoss_SingleFrame_Bulb2_1x1Dettifoss (Single Frame, Bulb #2), northern Iceland (16″x16″)


Selfoss, Iceland

Selfoss pours over and through jumbled basalt columns a few hundred meters upstream from Dettifoss, the most powerful waterfall in Europe. Selfoss and Dettifoss are both formed by the Jokulsa a Fhollum river in northern Iceland as it flows from the glacier Vatnajokull’s to the Arctic sea to the north.

Aldeyjarfoss_Falls_northernIceland

Selfoss, northern Iceland (12″x18″)


Goðafoss Part 2, Iceland

After photographing Goðafoss from the cliffs on the north side of the river, I set my tripod up on the south and took a few bulb exposures looking down at the falls. This panorama is one of my favorites from the morning: constant mist billowing up from the cascading water changing into misty silk in the bulb exposure.

Godafoss_from_South_LookingDown_IcelandLooking down on Goðafoss from South (Bulb), northern Iceland (16″x48″)

 


Goðafoss, Iceland

Rivers and streams flowing down to the ocean create a tremendous number of waterfalls in Iceland. On my trip around the ring road, I stopped to photograph one famous set of waterfalls – Goðafoss – where a river pours over a shelf of rock creating five falls of various sizes. Driving rain kept me in the car for a few minutes, but the cloud passed and I was able to photograph the falls from a few angles without getting my camera too wet. I first took a few photographs after rock hopping to the cliff at the top of the falls (first photo below- no ND filter). I then walked down stream and set my tripod up so I could take a bulb exposure looking back up at the falls (second panorama- with ND filter). Note the dark rain cloud that is looming in the upper right corner of most of my photographs on this day.

LookingDownOnGodafossIcelandLooking down on Goðafoss, northern Iceland (16″x54″)

 

Godafoss_Bulb_Number2_IcelandGoðafoss (Bulb #2), northern Iceland (16″x54″)

 


Ólafsvík Waterfall, Iceland

On Snæfellsnes peninsula, streams flowing off the flanks of the mountain cascade over basalt cliffs, forming a series of falls in the shifting clouds.

ÓlafsvíkFalls3_IcelandÓlafsvík Falls (#3), Ólafsvík, Iceland (16″x40″)


Öxarárfoss, Iceland

After visiting Gulfoss we drove west back towards Reykjavik and stopped for a quick walk to Öxarárfoss, a waterfall in Þingvellir National Park. The falls cascade over basalt cliffs into the fault line/ravine along the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that separates the North American and the Eurasian tectonic plates. As a geoscientist and a photographer, this location was particularly exciting to visit for me. I clearly wasn’t the only one who wanted to see the falls- I ‘had to’ sit and just enjoy the view while waiting for a group of photographers to move on to their next stop before I could shoot panoramas of the falls from a variety of angles without interruption.

Oxararfoss_Rocks_Iceland_Pano3

Öxarárfoss and Rocks, Þingvellir National Park, Iceland (18″x44″)


Gulfoss, Iceland Part II

After photographing Gulfoss from below, I walked up the stairs and out onto the plateau above the canyon to photograph the river as it enters the falls.

Gulfoss_Plateau_IcelandGulfoss Plateau, southwest Iceland (18″x58″)