Landscape and Panoramic Photography

HDR

Öxarárfoss, Iceland

After visiting Gulfoss we drove west back towards Reykjavik and stopped for a quick walk to Öxarárfoss, a waterfall in Þingvellir National Park. The falls cascade over basalt cliffs into the fault line/ravine along the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that separates the North American and the Eurasian tectonic plates. As a geoscientist and a photographer, this location was particularly exciting to visit for me. I clearly wasn’t the only one who wanted to see the falls- I ‘had to’ sit and just enjoy the view while waiting for a group of photographers to move on to their next stop before I could shoot panoramas of the falls from a variety of angles without interruption.

Oxararfoss_Rocks_Iceland_Pano3

Öxarárfoss and Rocks, Þingvellir National Park, Iceland (18″x44″)


Gulfoss, Iceland Part II

After photographing Gulfoss from below, I walked up the stairs and out onto the plateau above the canyon to photograph the river as it enters the falls.

Gulfoss_Plateau_IcelandGulfoss Plateau, southwest Iceland (18″x58″)


Gulfoss, Iceland Panorama

In late May, I traveled to Iceland to hike and take photographs. We first visited Gulfoss, a giant set of falls in the canyon of the Hvítá river in southwest Iceland. Iceland has become much more popular to visit since my last visit 9 years ago, so finding an unobstructed view of the cascading water can be difficult. Furthermore, even in late spring and early summer, strong winds and near constant spitting rain make it hard to keep the camera lens dry while taking long-exposure photographs.

GulfossUpperCascades_IcelandGulfoss Upper Cascades, southwest Iceland (16″x42″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 3

While photographing Tanque Verde Falls, the striations in the rock kept drawing my attention. I tried to get in close to the cliff face to use the striped rock to both frame the falls and lead the viewer’s eye towards the cascading water.

StriationsAndTanqueVerdeFalls

Striations and Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x36″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 2

After taking a few photographs of Tanque Verde Falls from above, I tried to get below the falls to photograph the water from below. I made the main focus of the three-frame vertical panorama the small cascade at my feet, but I tried to capture the larger falls in the upper right corner of the composition.

LookingUpAtUpperTanqueVerdeFalls

Looking Up at Upper Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x15″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 1

Last February, I took a late winter walk out to the upper portion of Tanque Verde Falls. After scrambling around on the rock shelves for a few minutes, I found a spot that allowed me to photograph both the cascading water and the striations in the cliff face.

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsColor

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (color), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsBW

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (B&W), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)


Lower Lake Levels

As I mentioned in a previous week’s post, lake levels were down in 2016 in the mountains of far western Nepal after an especially hot year. I am accustomed to ‘bathtub ring’ images of Lake Powell in the American Southwest, but we could see our own ‘bathtub ring’ effect around our study lakes in the Himalaya.

bathtubringsaroundretreatinglakenepalBathtub Rings around Retreating Lake, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x42″)

cloudreflectionsinlakenepalCloud Reflections in Shrinking Lake, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x41″)

 


Shadows at Sunset

The rain stopped and many of the clouds started to clear off by sunset, so I climbed out of my tent, grabbed my camera and tripod, and rest stepped my way up the hill above camp to photograph the landscape as the sun descended over the ridge the west. I think the panorama with the rock in the foreground was one of my most successful photographs on the trip (first panorama). Although I don’t usually include my own image in my photographs, I also liked the way my shadow falls across the hillside opposite the setting sun (second panorama).

 

rockshadowatsunsetnepalRock Shadow at Sunset over the Lake, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x44″)

risingshadowsretreatingcloudssunsetnepalRising Shadows and Retreating Clouds at Sunset, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x60″)


Camp in the High River Valley

After descending from the pass and high plateau, we continued up a river valley and made camp on the bank near sunset. Rhododendron bushes and small trees lined the hillsides at the edge of tree line, and landslide debris was piled on the hillsides (first panorama). Another rainstorm rolled through around sunset, and I was able to photograph a few grazing horses on a ridge top in front of the clouds (second, third panoramas).

landslidedebrishillsidenepalLandslide Debris and Hillside, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x55″)

horsesstormcloudsonridgenepalHorses and Storm Clouds on the Ridge, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x32″)

streamstormcloudshillsidenepalStorm Clouds over Hillside and Stream, near Jumla, Nepal (13″x53″)


Cloudy Pass

We rested at a high plateau on the pass near ~14,500+ feet. Horses and sheep appear to graze at this elevation, and the soil appears to be eroding rapidly (first panorama). The landscape is mostly covered in shades of brown, but occasional patches of yellow wildflowers seem to flow through dry stream beds (second panorama). On our way down from the plateau, we passed a herd of horses grazing near 14,000 feet (third panorama).

erodedpassandcloudsnepalEroded Pass and Clouds, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x62″)

flowersonpassnepalFlowers on the Pass, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x72″)

streamvalleyhorsesonpassnepalStream Valley and Horses on the Pass, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x64″)