Landscape and Panoramic Photography

Posts tagged “Canyon

Milagrosa and Agua Caliente, Part 2

Here is a second series of photographs from my Milagrosa to Agua Caliente Canyon loop hike. I was amazed to see water flowing near the top of Agua Caliente (second photograph) even though we had received so little moisture for most of the winter.

LookingDownMilagrosaCanyon

Looking down Milagrosa Canyon, Milagrosa Canyon, AZ (16″x33″)

FallsinAguaCalienteCanyon

Falls in Agua Caliente, Agua Caliente Canyon, AZ (12″x18″)


Milagrosa to Agua Caliente Canyon

In March, I hiked up Milagrosa Canyon (I have posted climbing photographs from this canyon in the past). I exited the top of Milagrosa by scrambling up a series of stepped dry waterfalls. I then picked my way across a hill through the Sonoran Desert until I hit a trail that dropped back down into the head of Agua Caliente Canyon. After a brief swim at a lunch time pool, I boulder-hopped down Agua Caliente to where the two canyons join near the road. As I was sliding from boulder to boulder, countless thumb-sized, camouflaged desert toads hopped out of the way of my feet. Overall, the day was at least an 8/10 stars for fun- it felt rugged without ever being more than three hours from a trailhead.

SaguaroCactiMarchingIntoMilagrosa

Saguaro Cacti Marching into Milagrosa, Milagrosa Canyon, AZ (14″x16″)

AguaCalientePools

Agua Caliente Pools, Agua Caliente Canyon, AZ (16″x42″)


Homestead Climbing

Two hours north of Tucson along Arizona State Route 77, a small turnoff dumps you out onto a dirt road that winds up into the hilly desert. The southern Arizona climbing community has created a series of trails and low-impact camping sites so climbers can unobtrusively set up a tent and climb in the limestone canyon known as ‘The Homestead’. The limestone cracks and overhangs in this area are a fun alternative to climbing the granite and schist of Mt Lemmon.

HomesteadCanyonCliffs

Homestead Canyon Cliffs, Gila County, AZ (16″x54″)

FarOffTheGroundAtHomeSteadCanyon

Far off the Ground at Homestead Canyon, Gila County, AZ (16″x44″)


Window Peak Summit

After hiking to Ventana Arch, we scrambled up the rock towers of Window Peak. The approach to the summit took a few hours; we had to ascend at least 4,500 feet from the trailhead to the peak, but the views were worth the walk. The hike down to Sabino Canyon was also gorgeous- a few rainclouds blew over and spat a few drops of water on us as we passed the last ridge near sunset.

LookingDownFromWindowPeak

Looking Down from Window Peak, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x57″)

SaguaroandEveningCloudsSabino

Saguaro and Evening Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x36″)

 

 


Ventana Canyon and Ventana Arch

Early in March, I hiked up the Ventana Canyon trail to Ventana Arch and back down through Sabino Canyon. Here are a few panoramas I took on the way up to the Arch.

VentanaArchCliffHillsSkyBW

Ventana Arch, Cliff, Hills, and Sky, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x53″)

MaidenPoolsRocksCacti

Maiden Pools Rocks and Cacti, Ventana Canyon, AZ (16″x50″)


Flowing Stream at Hairpin

Winter rain and snow on Mt Lemmon brought enough moisture to the Sonoran Desert to make this usually dry stream bed in Hairpin Canyon fill with water. On this particular day, I didn’t expect to take many photographs (I was out to climb), so I didn’t have my tripod in my backpack. I used a rock instead (bottom photograph) and managed to take a long(er) exposure set of photographs for the panorama using image stabilization (basically a gyroscope in the lens)- it’s amazing how well this relatively new technology works in a pinch (but I still wish I had my tripod!).

FallsCliffsHairpinCanyon

Falls and Cliffs at Hairpin Canyon, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x47″)

FallsLogSkyatHairpin

Falls, Log, and Sky at Hairpin, Coronado National Forest, AZ (12″x18″)


Winter Sky in the Catalinas

While climbing in January near the base of Mt Lemmon, I stopped at the mouth of a small canyon to take this vertical panorama of the rock, vegetation, and clouds.

BushWinterCloudsSaguaro

Bush and Winter Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x38″)


Hairpin Cliffs and Winter Clouds

In early January, one of our only winter storms blew through southern Arizona (in what was supposed to be an unusually wet El Nino winter here in the Southwest). I was hoping to go climbing further up in the Catalina Mountains, but the Highway was closed, so we parked and walked our climbing gear up to Hairpin and spent a gorgeous day listening to a flowing creek and climbing beneath a ceiling of billowing winter clouds.

HairpinCliffsWinterCloudsHairpin Cliffs and Winter Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x50″)


Aravaipa River Panorama

While the rest of my group hiked up the river, I spent about half an hour standing knee-deep in water photographing ripples and a small rapid in the Aravaipa River. Here is one of my favorite angles on the water and rocks.

AravaipaFlowingWater

Aravaipa Flowing Water, Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness, AZ (16″x56″)


Tree over Observation Point

This tree hangs over the cliff next to the trail that winds up the steep rock face to Observation Point in Zion National Park.

TreeOverZiononApproachtoObservationPtTree over Zion on Approach to Observation Point, Zion National Park, Utah (16″x47″)