Landscape and Panoramic Photography

Posts tagged “flowing water

Spouting Rock and Stream

A vertical panorama of the stream and falls above Hanging Lake in Glenwood Canyon, Colorado. This panorama is composed of three horizontal single-frame images stitched together so I could capture the mini-falls and stream in the foreground below where I was standing as well as Spouting Rock in front/above.

Spouting Rock and Stream (B&W, 2021), Hanging Lake, Glenwood Canyon, CO (19″x20.5″)


Spouting Rock, Hanging Lake, June 2021

There is a long history in my family of hiking up to Hanging Lake and Spouting Rock- my maternal grandmother had heart problems and still managed to make her way up to the lake most years up until she died. After the fire in the summer of 2020 in Glenwood Canyon, I expected the vegetation to be burned out, but most of the trees are still standing in the canyon. There is an occasional charred tree trunk that has fallen into the canyon along the trail, but most of the area around the trail made it through unscathed. Despite the heat wave, it was a nice walk up to the lake. I hope the remainder of the canyon recovers from the fire- the scrub oak are already regrowing.

Spouting Rock (Color, 2021), Glenwood Canyon, Colorado (14″x21″)

Roaring Fork Creek Falls, NC

Roaring Fork Creek Falls near the base of Mt Mitchell, just off the Blue Ridge Parkway, Pisgah National Forest. I liked the zig-zag path the water takes down the rocks.

Roaring Fork Creek Falls (Panorama), Pisgah National Forest, NC (16″x36″)

Roaring Fork Creek Falls (Single Frame), Pisgah National Forest, NC (12″x18″)


Downed Trees after Winter Storm

Downed, broken trees from a winter storm scattered around Coal Creek and falls near Bellevue, WA.

CoalCreekFallsDownedTrees_Vert_SingleFrame_2019

Coal Creek Falls and Logs, near Bellevue, WA (12″x18″)


Spouting Rock above Hanging Lake, CO

Visiting the same location year after year forces me to try to see the same scene from new perspectives. This summer, I spent more time to the right of the falls taking a few long exposures of the water flowing out of the limestone at Spouting Rock above Hanging Lake.

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Spouting Rock (Horizontal #3, Color, 2018), Hanging Lake, Colorado (16″x20″)

 

SpoutingRock_Panorama1_Vert_2018

Spouting Rock (Vertical #3, Color, 2018), Hanging Lake, Colorado (28″x16″)

 

 


Svartifoss, Iceland

The cascading waters of Svartifoss slowly eat away at the rock, leaving jumbled piles of basalt in the ravine below. Columnar jointing in basalt flows + waterfall = perfect photography opportunity for a Geoscientist (and thousands of other photographers).

Svartifoss_Panorama_BW_IcelandSvartifoss and Columnar Basalt, Vatnajökull National Park,Iceland (16″x36″)


Wild Basin Waterfalls

My first weekend in Boulder, I drove to the southeastern corner of Rocky Mountain National Park and hiked up to the back of Isolation Peak. On the way back down, I stopped at Ouzel Falls and Calypso Cascades to take a few long-exposure/bulb photographs of the flowing water.

OuzelFallsAndStump

Ouzel Falls and Stump, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO (16″x28″)

CalypsoCascadesAndLogs

Calypso Cascades and Logs, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO (16″x27″)


Flowing Stream at Hairpin

Winter rain and snow on Mt Lemmon brought enough moisture to the Sonoran Desert to make this usually dry stream bed in Hairpin Canyon fill with water. On this particular day, I didn’t expect to take many photographs (I was out to climb), so I didn’t have my tripod in my backpack. I used a rock instead (bottom photograph) and managed to take a long(er) exposure set of photographs for the panorama using image stabilization (basically a gyroscope in the lens)- it’s amazing how well this relatively new technology works in a pinch (but I still wish I had my tripod!).

FallsCliffsHairpinCanyon

Falls and Cliffs at Hairpin Canyon, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x47″)

FallsLogSkyatHairpin

Falls, Log, and Sky at Hairpin, Coronado National Forest, AZ (12″x18″)


Shadows in the Narrows of Zion

There tends to be a break from southern Utah rainfall in mid-May to June, and this is the perfect time for canyoneering in Zion and hiking The Narrows. The spring snows have mostly melted, and the water is more tolerable without a wet suit. This June I spent a day in the Echo Canyon area, then I took an overnight trip down the Narrows from Chamberlains Ranch. Here is one of my favorite panoramas from one of the thinner sections in the Narrows.

NarrowsShadowsandLight16x28Narrows Shadow and Light, The Narrows, Zion National Park, Utah (16″x28″)