Landscape and Panoramic Photography

Posts tagged “HDR

Goðafoss, Iceland

Rivers and streams flowing down to the ocean create a tremendous number of waterfalls in Iceland. On my trip around the ring road, I stopped to photograph one famous set of waterfalls – Goðafoss – where a river pours over a shelf of rock creating five falls of various sizes. Driving rain kept me in the car for a few minutes, but the cloud passed and I was able to photograph the falls from a few angles without getting my camera too wet. I first took a few photographs after rock hopping to the cliff at the top of the falls (first photo below- no ND filter). I then walked down stream and set my tripod up so I could take a bulb exposure looking back up at the falls (second panorama- with ND filter). Note the dark rain cloud that is looming in the upper right corner of most of my photographs on this day.

LookingDownOnGodafossIcelandLooking down on Goðafoss, northern Iceland (16″x54″)

 

Godafoss_Bulb_Number2_IcelandGoðafoss (Bulb #2), northern Iceland (16″x54″)

 

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Ólafsvík Waterfall, Iceland

On Snæfellsnes peninsula, streams flowing off the flanks of the mountain cascade over basalt cliffs, forming a series of falls in the shifting clouds.

ÓlafsvíkFalls3_IcelandÓlafsvík Falls (#3), Ólafsvík, Iceland (16″x40″)


Öxarárfoss, Iceland

After visiting Gulfoss we drove west back towards Reykjavik and stopped for a quick walk to Öxarárfoss, a waterfall in Þingvellir National Park. The falls cascade over basalt cliffs into the fault line/ravine along the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that separates the North American and the Eurasian tectonic plates. As a geoscientist and a photographer, this location was particularly exciting to visit for me. I clearly wasn’t the only one who wanted to see the falls- I ‘had to’ sit and just enjoy the view while waiting for a group of photographers to move on to their next stop before I could shoot panoramas of the falls from a variety of angles without interruption.

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Öxarárfoss and Rocks, Þingvellir National Park, Iceland (18″x44″)


Gulfoss, Iceland Part II

After photographing Gulfoss from below, I walked up the stairs and out onto the plateau above the canyon to photograph the river as it enters the falls.

Gulfoss_Plateau_IcelandGulfoss Plateau, southwest Iceland (18″x58″)


Gulfoss, Iceland Panorama

In late May, I traveled to Iceland to hike and take photographs. We first visited Gulfoss, a giant set of falls in the canyon of the Hvítá river in southwest Iceland. Iceland has become much more popular to visit since my last visit 9 years ago, so finding an unobstructed view of the cascading water can be difficult. Furthermore, even in late spring and early summer, strong winds and near constant spitting rain make it hard to keep the camera lens dry while taking long-exposure photographs.

GulfossUpperCascades_IcelandGulfoss Upper Cascades, southwest Iceland (16″x42″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 3

While photographing Tanque Verde Falls, the striations in the rock kept drawing my attention. I tried to get in close to the cliff face to use the striped rock to both frame the falls and lead the viewer’s eye towards the cascading water.

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Striations and Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x36″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 2

After taking a few photographs of Tanque Verde Falls from above, I tried to get below the falls to photograph the water from below. I made the main focus of the three-frame vertical panorama the small cascade at my feet, but I tried to capture the larger falls in the upper right corner of the composition.

LookingUpAtUpperTanqueVerdeFalls

Looking Up at Upper Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x15″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 1

Last February, I took a late winter walk out to the upper portion of Tanque Verde Falls. After scrambling around on the rock shelves for a few minutes, I found a spot that allowed me to photograph both the cascading water and the striations in the cliff face.

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsColor

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (color), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsBW

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (B&W), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)


River Crossing, into the Cloud Forest

We passed through rice fields, crossed rivers, and finally drove up a steep, narrow dirt road into the rhododendron cloud forest. After establishing a camp at the end of the road, we spent a few days studying lakes formed by landslides a few centuries ago. Here is a panorama of one of the smaller rivers and steep hillsides. Also, a view from our camp of the surrounding town and boulder-covered landscape at the end of the road.

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Steep Hills, River, and Boulders, far western Nepal (16″x41″)

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Village at the End of the Road, far western Nepal (16″x75″)


Cirque Camping above Kite Lake, CO

While working Boulder this July, I drove up to Kite Lake near Fairplay and Alma, CO. The camping areas near the lake were packed, so I hiked up a cirque along Buckskin Creek and set up camp near 12,500 feet in an isolated meadow. The cirque was relatively close to the parking area, but the steep hill blocked the view of the road and trails, so the area felt like the middle of the wilderness. The next morning, I slid out of my sleeping bag before sunrise to hike up a few peaks in the area- see future posts for peak panoramas.

SnowFieldandStreamnearKiteLake.jpgSnow Field and Stream, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x54″)

UnnamedCrescentLakenearKiteLake.jpgUnnamed Crescent Lake, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x60″)