Landscape and Panoramic Photography

Posts tagged “Hiking

Sunrise over the Lake

The weather at 14,000 feet in June in the Himalaya can make coring lakes difficult. The sky tends to be clear from around sunrise to 11:00 AM, so I woke up early every morning, shook the ice off my tent, ate a quick breakfast, and got out on the lake to start work before conditions made coring nearly impossible (hail, lightning, thick fog). Here is a panorama of a picturesque cold, clear sunrise before we started our work.

shorelinesunriseshadowsnepalShoreline, Sunrise, and Shadows, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x62″)


Lake Basecamp

The final push up the river valley and a steep ravine to our lake basecamp would have been easy at 5,000 feet, but near 14,000 feet, carrying a heavy pack up a hill can be exhausting. However, the relatively short hike to our campsite was worth the view- a lake basin surrounded by constantly shifting clouds draped over craggy peaks near 16,000 feet. Although these ‘hills’ are insignificant by Nepali standards, for North Americans doing field work in the area it was a beautiful sight. The lake levels were noticeably lower this year- a few warmer and drier seasons had left lake levels well below where they had been on our previous trip two years ago (see exposed shoreline in second panorama).

firstlookatthelakenepalFirst Look at the Lake, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x93″)

exposedshorelinerocksandcampnepalExposed Shoreline Rocks and Camp, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x58″)


Camp in the High River Valley

After descending from the pass and high plateau, we continued up a river valley and made camp on the bank near sunset. Rhododendron bushes and small trees lined the hillsides at the edge of tree line, and landslide debris was piled on the hillsides (first panorama). Another rainstorm rolled through around sunset, and I was able to photograph a few grazing horses on a ridge top in front of the clouds (second, third panoramas).

landslidedebrishillsidenepalLandslide Debris and Hillside, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x55″)

horsesstormcloudsonridgenepalHorses and Storm Clouds on the Ridge, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x32″)

streamstormcloudshillsidenepalStorm Clouds over Hillside and Stream, near Jumla, Nepal (13″x53″)


Cloudy Pass

We rested at a high plateau on the pass near ~14,500+ feet. Horses and sheep appear to graze at this elevation, and the soil appears to be eroding rapidly (first panorama). The landscape is mostly covered in shades of brown, but occasional patches of yellow wildflowers seem to flow through dry stream beds (second panorama). On our way down from the plateau, we passed a herd of horses grazing near 14,000 feet (third panorama).

erodedpassandcloudsnepalEroded Pass and Clouds, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x62″)

flowersonpassnepalFlowers on the Pass, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x72″)

streamvalleyhorsesonpassnepalStream Valley and Horses on the Pass, near Jumla, Nepal (16″x64″)


Hiking over the Pass in Fog, Part II

We crossed into the Karnali River drainage in the fog at ~3,500m elevation. After descending just a few hundred meters, the mists cleared, and we were able to see down valley. The descent was slippery, but as the rain stopped, the land leeches retreated and the hiking was relatively easy.

fogandtreesonthepass2Fog and Trees on the Pass (2), far western Nepal (16″x47″)

descendingoutofthecloudsDescending out of the Clouds, far western Nepal (16″x47″)

 


Hiking Over the Pass in Fog

The pre-monsoon rains filled the rivers with water in the valleys; worried about the rising water, the truck drivers left us before the rivers became impassable and drove around the mountain range to meet us in the Karnali River valley near Manma. After coring the mid-elevation lakes, we packed our field equipment and started our multi-day journey through the mountains to meet the rest of the trucks. A slippery stone path led us over a pass through the dripping branches, wet leaves, and land leeches. Occasional dog barks and other sounds echoed through the fog as we walked, but the fog obscured any views of the surrounding countryside.

stonepathandtreesinthefogStone Path and Trees in the Fog, far western Nepal (16″x48″)

fogandtreesonthepassFog and Trees on the Pass, far western Nepal (16″x48″)


Above Tree Line in Colorado

Here are a few more panoramas taken around sunrise at 14,000+ feet in Colorado.

ridgelinefrommtlincoln

Ridge Line from Mt Lincoln, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x50″)

ridgeshadowstomtdemocrat

Ridge Shadows to Mt Democrat, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x70″)

risingsunovermtlincoln

Rising Sun over Mt Lincoln, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x64″)

 


Mt Bross

After hiking up the flank of Mt Democrat, we turned to the east and headed towards Mt Lincoln to avoid the large crowds on the first peak. We followed the ridge to Mt Licoln, ate breakfast, then walked up the side of Mt Bross and down to Kite Lake. The mining equipment, pits, and trails are quite the spectacle at 14,000+ feet .

MiningEquipmentTrailsMountDemocrat.jpgMining Equipment, Trails, and Mount Democrat, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x67″)

ScreeAndTalusOnMtBross.jpgScree and Talus Field on Mt Bross, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x60″)


Hiking above Kite Lake, CO

A few photographs from the Buckskin Creek cirque/headwaters and my Kite Lake-Mt Lincoln-Mt Bross hike.

AloneInTheSkynearKiteLakeCO.jpgAlone in the Sky, near Kite Lake, CO (12″x18″)

LookingBackFromMtBross.jpg

Looking Back from Mt Bross, near Kite Lake, CO (12″x18″)


Cirque Camping above Kite Lake, CO

While working Boulder this July, I drove up to Kite Lake near Fairplay and Alma, CO. The camping areas near the lake were packed, so I hiked up a cirque along Buckskin Creek and set up camp near 12,500 feet in an isolated meadow. The cirque was relatively close to the parking area, but the steep hill blocked the view of the road and trails, so the area felt like the middle of the wilderness. The next morning, I slid out of my sleeping bag before sunrise to hike up a few peaks in the area- see future posts for peak panoramas.

SnowFieldandStreamnearKiteLake.jpgSnow Field and Stream, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x54″)

UnnamedCrescentLakenearKiteLake.jpgUnnamed Crescent Lake, near Kite Lake, CO (16″x60″)


Wild Basin Cliffs and Clouds

A few weeks ago, I hiked past Bluebird Lake (along the Wild Basin trail in Rocky Mountain National Park), scrambled up a scree field, and made my way along an old cirque above tree line just below Isolation Peak. The towering cliffs and exposed rocks are stunning when viewed up close. Looking down valley, I seemed to be standing above the clouds.

UnnamedRidgeCliffsCloudsRMNP

Unnamed Ridge, Cliffs, and Clouds, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO (16″x42″)


Wild Basin Waterfalls

My first weekend in Boulder, I drove to the southeastern corner of Rocky Mountain National Park and hiked up to the back of Isolation Peak. On the way back down, I stopped at Ouzel Falls and Calypso Cascades to take a few long-exposure/bulb photographs of the flowing water.

OuzelFallsAndStump

Ouzel Falls and Stump, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO (16″x28″)

CalypsoCascadesAndLogs

Calypso Cascades and Logs, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO (16″x27″)


Milagrosa and Agua Caliente, Part 2

Here is a second series of photographs from my Milagrosa to Agua Caliente Canyon loop hike. I was amazed to see water flowing near the top of Agua Caliente (second photograph) even though we had received so little moisture for most of the winter.

LookingDownMilagrosaCanyon

Looking down Milagrosa Canyon, Milagrosa Canyon, AZ (16″x33″)

FallsinAguaCalienteCanyon

Falls in Agua Caliente, Agua Caliente Canyon, AZ (12″x18″)


Milagrosa to Agua Caliente Canyon

In March, I hiked up Milagrosa Canyon (I have posted climbing photographs from this canyon in the past). I exited the top of Milagrosa by scrambling up a series of stepped dry waterfalls. I then picked my way across a hill through the Sonoran Desert until I hit a trail that dropped back down into the head of Agua Caliente Canyon. After a brief swim at a lunch time pool, I boulder-hopped down Agua Caliente to where the two canyons join near the road. As I was sliding from boulder to boulder, countless thumb-sized, camouflaged desert toads hopped out of the way of my feet. Overall, the day was at least an 8/10 stars for fun- it felt rugged without ever being more than three hours from a trailhead.

SaguaroCactiMarchingIntoMilagrosa

Saguaro Cacti Marching into Milagrosa, Milagrosa Canyon, AZ (14″x16″)

AguaCalientePools

Agua Caliente Pools, Agua Caliente Canyon, AZ (16″x42″)


Homestead Climbing

Two hours north of Tucson along Arizona State Route 77, a small turnoff dumps you out onto a dirt road that winds up into the hilly desert. The southern Arizona climbing community has created a series of trails and low-impact camping sites so climbers can unobtrusively set up a tent and climb in the limestone canyon known as ‘The Homestead’. The limestone cracks and overhangs in this area are a fun alternative to climbing the granite and schist of Mt Lemmon.

HomesteadCanyonCliffs

Homestead Canyon Cliffs, Gila County, AZ (16″x54″)

FarOffTheGroundAtHomeSteadCanyon

Far off the Ground at Homestead Canyon, Gila County, AZ (16″x44″)


Window Peak Summit

After hiking to Ventana Arch, we scrambled up the rock towers of Window Peak. The approach to the summit took a few hours; we had to ascend at least 4,500 feet from the trailhead to the peak, but the views were worth the walk. The hike down to Sabino Canyon was also gorgeous- a few rainclouds blew over and spat a few drops of water on us as we passed the last ridge near sunset.

LookingDownFromWindowPeak

Looking Down from Window Peak, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x57″)

SaguaroandEveningCloudsSabino

Saguaro and Evening Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x36″)

 

 


Ventana Canyon and Ventana Arch

Early in March, I hiked up the Ventana Canyon trail to Ventana Arch and back down through Sabino Canyon. Here are a few panoramas I took on the way up to the Arch.

VentanaArchCliffHillsSkyBW

Ventana Arch, Cliff, Hills, and Sky, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x53″)

MaidenPoolsRocksCacti

Maiden Pools Rocks and Cacti, Ventana Canyon, AZ (16″x50″)


Turret Rocks Climbing

The vertical panorama can help give a sense of scale from the base of a cliff, but the perspective inherent in this type of panorama can also distort the image. As I’ve been working on my climbing photography, I have tried a few techniques that I would normally never employ in my landscape work; here I wanted to emphasize the artificial, human aspect that we bring to a traditional (‘trad’) climbing route even if we remove all the gear when we’re finished.

OnLeadUpTurretRock

On Lead up Turret Rock, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x42″)


Chessman Climbing

Some 2,000 climbing routes line the Catalina Highway (the 2-lane road leading to the top of Mt Lemmon outside Tucson, AZ). This year, my goal has been to try a new climbing area every weekend; back in February, I hiked up the steep wash around Milepost 10 to the Chessman cliffs. Circling birds of prey, ravens, and canyon wrens surrounded us all day. I took this vertical panorama of the spectacular 5.11-, Two Kings and a Pawn, as one of my friends was leading it.

SendingTwoKingsAndAPawn_ChessmanClimbing

Sending Two Kings and a Pawn, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x36″)


Ridge to Mt Wrightson

After reaching the top of Elephant Head, I stepped over to the west face of the rock and took a panorama of the fingers of eroded ridges and washes fading into the distance. On the hike down the backbone, I stopped to take a vertical panorama of the ridge leading up to Mount Wrightson, the tallest peak in southern Arizona.

GrassRockCloudsErosion

Grass, Rocks, Clouds, and Erosion, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x45″)

RidgetoWrightonFromElephantHead

Ridge to Wrightson from Elephant Head, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x30″)


Trail to Elephant Head

Elephant Head is a promontory of rock that juts out to the west of the Santa Rita Mountain Range in southern Arizona. Late this winter, I finally decided to hike up the back of the ridge to the top of the fin of rock. Although this is the least technical of the approaches, it was still a fourth class scramble for the last bit of the walk. The views of the high desert foothills and cliffs along the way are spectacular.

TrailtoElephantHeadandYucca

Yucca and Trail to Elephant Head, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x53″)

ErodedCliffsandFins

Eroded Cliffs and Fins from Elephant Head, Coronado National Forest, AZ (12″x18″)


The Ruins Climbing, Mt Lemmon

The southwest-facing cliff at The Ruins crag provides a great location for a pleasant day of winter climbing in southern Arizona. I wanted to capture the full size of the rock face, a little foreground at the base, and the mountains fading into the distance off to the south (right), so I ended up stitching together a series of stacked photographs for this double-tall panorama.

RuinsClimbingCliffBW

The Ruins Cliff, Coronado National Forest, AZ (20″x40″)


Flowing Stream at Hairpin

Winter rain and snow on Mt Lemmon brought enough moisture to the Sonoran Desert to make this usually dry stream bed in Hairpin Canyon fill with water. On this particular day, I didn’t expect to take many photographs (I was out to climb), so I didn’t have my tripod in my backpack. I used a rock instead (bottom photograph) and managed to take a long(er) exposure set of photographs for the panorama using image stabilization (basically a gyroscope in the lens)- it’s amazing how well this relatively new technology works in a pinch (but I still wish I had my tripod!).

FallsCliffsHairpinCanyon

Falls and Cliffs at Hairpin Canyon, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x47″)

FallsLogSkyatHairpin

Falls, Log, and Sky at Hairpin, Coronado National Forest, AZ (12″x18″)


Winter Sky in the Catalinas

While climbing in January near the base of Mt Lemmon, I stopped at the mouth of a small canyon to take this vertical panorama of the rock, vegetation, and clouds.

BushWinterCloudsSaguaro

Bush and Winter Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x38″)