Landscape and Panoramic Photography

Posts tagged “Tucson

Lower Tanque Verde Falls

After visiting the Upper Tanque Verde Falls in February (see previous week’s post), I hiked up to the Lower Falls in March. The hike to the Lower Falls allowed for a bit of exploration and boulder hopping, but I preferred to photograph the clearly delineated cliff striations at the Upper Falls. After using an ND filter to make the water flatten out, I was able to walk away with at least one good panorama of the Lower Falls.

GlassyWaterAndLowerTanqueVerdeFalls

Glassy Water and Lower Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x54″)

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Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 3

While photographing Tanque Verde Falls, the striations in the rock kept drawing my attention. I tried to get in close to the cliff face to use the striped rock to both frame the falls and lead the viewer’s eye towards the cascading water.

StriationsAndTanqueVerdeFalls

Striations and Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x36″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 2

After taking a few photographs of Tanque Verde Falls from above, I tried to get below the falls to photograph the water from below. I made the main focus of the three-frame vertical panorama the small cascade at my feet, but I tried to capture the larger falls in the upper right corner of the composition.

LookingUpAtUpperTanqueVerdeFalls

Looking Up at Upper Tanque Verde Falls, near Tucson, AZ (16″x15″)


Upper Tanque Verde Falls, Part 1

Last February, I took a late winter walk out to the upper portion of Tanque Verde Falls. After scrambling around on the rock shelves for a few minutes, I found a spot that allowed me to photograph both the cascading water and the striations in the cliff face.

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsColor

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (color), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)

LookingDownOnUpperTanqueVerdeFallsBW

Looking Down on Upper Tanque Verde Falls (B&W), near Tucson, AZ (16″x32″)


Tucson Mountains Saguaro Cacti

I went for a January pre winter  storm (in Tucson read: rainstorm) hike in the Tucson Mountains. Cactus spines and arms stood out in front of the approaching clouds.

cactustopcloudstucsonmountainsCactus Top and Clouds, Tucson Mountains, AZ (12″x18″)

cactiinthecloudstucsonmountainsSaguaro Cacti in the Clouds, Tucson Mountains, AZ (12″x18″)


End of the Tucson Monsoon

Another angle on the monsoon storm over Tucson.

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Monsoon Storm over Tucson from Windy Point, Coronado National Forest, AZ (14″x48″)


Lightning over Tucson

While climbing on one of the fins at Windy Point (along the Catalina Highway outside Tucson, AZ) in August, I watched a monsoon storm rumble across the valley below. I took a few minutes to photograph the storm clouds as they approached us. After I drove home I realized that I had also captured a lightning bolt in the panorama.

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Lightning and Monsoon Clouds fromWindy Point, Coronado National Forest, AZ (26″x64″)


Monsoon from Sentinel Peak

When I stepped off the plane from Nepal in late June, it was about 110F (~40C) here in southern Arizona. Fortunately, the monsoon started soon after I arrived. After work one evening I drove up to the top of Sentinel Peak (near downtown Tucson) and shot a few panoramas of the lumbering monsoon storms as they approached from the south.

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Monsoon Storm from Sentinel Peak #2, Tucson Mountains, AZ (16″x74″)


Boot Hill Climbing

Routes on the north and west faces of the rock promontory above the Prison Camp area make for great spring climbing along the Catalina Highway on Mt Lemmon. I especially liked the shadows of the passing clouds on the hills in the background.

BootHillCliffsAndClouds

Boot Hill Cliffs and Clouds, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x39″)


Green Slabs Climbing

Just past Milepost 9.9 and the Seven Cataracts Overlook, the road cut along the Catalina Highway (General Hitchcock Highway) forms two vertical cliffs on either side of the road. The climbing cliffs just uphill from this pullout are called The Green Slabs. There are a variety of traditional (‘trad’) routes on the south face and sport climbing on the north face. Here are a few photographs from the area.

FocusOnTheRockGreenSlabs

Focus on the Rock, Coronado National Forest, AZ (12″x18″)

GreenSlabsCliffsandHighway

Green Slabs Cliffs and Highway, Coronado National Forest, AZ (16″x49″)